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Can agricultural exports from Southern Cone countries make up for global supply disruptions arising from the Russia-Ukraine war?

Nov 19th, 2022 • by JOSEPH GLAUBER, DAVID LABORDE, VALERIA PIÑEIRO AND AGUSTÍN TEJEDA

The economies of the Southern Cone (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay), major agricultural exporters still recovering from the negative impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, have benefited from the rise in international prices accompanying the Russian invasion of Ukraine. With the war disrupting global supplies, the net exporting countries of the region have the opportunity to increase their exports.

Hunger Levels Continue on the Rise: 2022 Global Hunger Index Released

Nov 18th, 2022 • by S. Gustafson

Over the past two years, the impacts of ongoing regional conflicts, climate change, the COVID-19 pandemic, and the Russian-Ukraine war have drastically weakened the world’s already inadequate, unsustainable food systems. This confluence of factors has induced in supply chain disruptions and high and volatile prices for food, fertilizer, and fuel, and the result has been the third global food crisis in less than two decades.

How sanctions on Russia and Belarus are impacting exports of agricultural products and fertilizer

Nov 10th, 2022 • by JOSEPH GLAUBER AND DAVID LABORDE

The sanctions imposed by the European Union, United States, Canada, and other countries on Russia and Belarus following Russia’s February 24 invasion of Ukraine included restrictions on banking, trade, technology transfers, and specific individuals. These came on top of earlier sanctions on both countries – on Russia, in response to its 2014 annexation of Crimea, and on Belarus, in response to human rights violations in 2020 and its forced grounding of Ryanair flight 4798 to seize a dissident journalist in 2021.

Suspension of the Black Sea Grain Initiative: What has the deal achieved, and what happens now?

Nov 2nd, 2022 • by DAVID LABORDE AND JOSEPH GLAUBER

Russia’s October 29 announcement that it was suspending its participation in the Black Sea Grain Initiative—which allows shipments out of Ukrainian ports—was not a surprise; Russia had been skeptical of the deal since the start. But now the supply disruptions will begin again: the move will have a negative impact on Ukraine, its customers, on world market prices—and global food security, particularly for countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region.