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IFPRI Global Food Policy Report 2022: Accelerating food systems transformation to combat climate change

May 24th, 2022 • by JOHAN SWINNEN, CHANNING ARNDT AND ROB VOS

In 2021, the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change sounded the alarm on a looming crisis: Climate change is generating a “code red for humanity” that requires urgent action. Food systems are deeply entwined with this crisis. In many regions, especially in the developing world, climate change has already started to reduce agricultural productivity and disrupt supply chains, putting pressure on livelihoods and threatening to significantly increase hunger and malnutrition, making adaptation efforts crucially important.

One of the world’s worst economic collapses, now compounded by the Ukraine crisis: What’s next for Lebanon?

May 16th, 2022 • by CLEMENS BREISINGER, NADIM KHOURI, JOSEPH GLAUBER AND DAVID LABORDE

High food prices and supply disruptions triggered by the Ukraine war are hitting Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) countries like Egypt, Sudan, and Yemen hard, partly due their heavy dependence on wheat imports. But in the region, Lebanon—already in the midst of one of the world’s worst economic collapses since the 1850s—is uniquely vulnerable to food security impacts from the Russia-Ukraine conflict.

A recent World Bank report calls Lebanon’s current crisis “The Great Denial”—referring to an ongoing breakdown of government services, civil society, and the economy.

The impact of the Ukraine crisis on the global vegetable oil market

May 16th, 2022 • by JOSEPH GLAUBER, DAVID LABORDE AND ABDULLAH MAMUN

The war in Ukraine has pushed prices of agricultural products to historically high levels, and concerns about global food security occupy headlines and world leaders’ minds, as demonstrated by recent IMF and World Bank meetings. So far, much of the attention has focused on grains, particularly wheat—because of its importance in diets, and the predicament of countries where wheat accounts for a large share of calories consumed, is largely imported, and is dominated by supplies from the Black Sea.