Food security is defined as access to sufficient food to meet the energy and nutrient requirements for a healthy and productive life. The majority of food-insecure people live in rural areas of developing countries. Their food security is heavily influenced by poverty, access to resources, and fluctuations in weather patterns and markets. Household and individual food security is also influenced by household behavior in general and intrahousehold allocations in particular, which in turn, are influenced by knowledge, promotion, and advertising. The cases in this section explain how government policies can reduce food insecurity caused by rural poverty and fluctuations in weather patterns and markets to which the rural poor are exposed, as well as change household allocative behavior and regulate external influences such as food advertising by retailers and wholesalers.

  • 4-1: Food Advertising Policy in the United States
    Leigh Gantner; 14 pp.
    Download PDF | Abstract

  • 4-2: Surviving Shocks in Ethiopia: The Role of Social Protection for Food Security
    Annick Hiensch; 10 pp.
    Download PDF | Abstract

  • 4-3: Niger’s Famine and the Role of Food Aid
    Alexandra C. Lewin; 10 pp.
    Download PDF | Abstract

  • 4-4: Zambia and Genetically Modified Food Aid
    Alexandra C. Lewin; 12 pp.
    Download PDF | Abstract

  • 4-5: Intrahousehold Allocation, Gender Relations, and Food Security in Developing Countries
    Agnes R. Quisumbing, and Lisa C. Smith; 13 pp.
    Download PDF | Abstract

PreviewAttachmentSize
Food Advertising Policy in the United States277.99 KB
Intrahousehold Allocation, Gender Relations, and Food Security in Developing Countries331.87 KB
Niger’s Famine and the Role of Food Aid485.13 KB
Surviving Shocks in Ethiopia: The Role of Social Protection for Food Security244.74 KB
Zambia and Genetically Modified Food Aid526.29 KB
Share