Photo credit: Dana McMahan

By: Sara Gustafson

The FAO Food Price Index continued to rise in January for the fourth consecutive month. While the month-on-month increase from December was marginal (0.7 percent), the Index reached 11.3 percent higher than its January 2019 levels. The increase was driven mainly by vegetable oil prices, although cereal prices also played a role to a lesser extent.

Photo credit: Mitchell Mayer/IFPRI

This piece originally appeared on IFPRI.org.

By Vincent H. Smith

Photo credit: Tri Saputro/CIFOR

Strong rebounds in global vegetable oil prices, as well as sugar and dairy prices, drove the FAO Food Price Index to its highest point in five years in December. The December Index rose by 4.4. percent from November, the third such consecutive monthly increase, and reached 181.7 points.

Despite this surge, however, the overall Index for 2019 only rose by 3.3 percent from 2018 levels and remained well below the record 230 points set in 2011.

How can we feed 10 billion people by 2050? How much and in what ways will climate change impact global food production? What can be done to ensure that the world’s agriculture and food systems remain sustainable in both the short and the long term?

Photo Credit: WTO

This post originally appeared on IFPRI.org.
By Rob Vos

As the world strives to feed a growing population in the face of declining natural resources and ongoing food security crises, commitment from policymakers to a sustainable food future is more important than ever. Argentina’s G20 Presidency has set sustainability and food security as a top priority for this year’s upcoming Ministerial Meeting, and these priorities were also focus of the recent T20 (Think 20) Summit, held in Buenos Aires in September 2018.

Photo credit: 禁书网中国禁闻

The FAO Food Price Index declined somewhat in September, falling 1.4 percent from August to an average of 165.4 points. This represents a 7.4 percent decline from September 2017 levels.

Photo Credit: CIMMYT

The FAO Food Price Index remained virtually unchanged in August, although cereal prices rose as a result of declining crop prospects. At 167.6 points, the Index is around 9 percent lower than its August 2017 levels.

Photo Credit: Oregon DOT

Both hard wheat and soft wheat prices are experiencing a period of excessive volatility, according to the Food Security Portal’s Excessive Food Price Variability Early Warning System. Hard wheat futures prices on the Chicago Board of Trade began experiencing excessive volatility earlier in August, while soft wheat prices began to see excessive movement toward the end of the month.

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