The FAO Food Price Index, released today, rose slightly in October to 205.8 points. While this is about 1.3 percent higher than in September, it is still 5.3 percent below its October 2012 levels. This small increase was driven mainly by rising sugar prices.

The latest FAO Food Price Index, released Thursday, continued to fall in September, down 2.3 points below August and a full 11 points from the beginning of the year. This marks the fifth consecutive decrease.

The Cereals Price Index dropped 12.9 points from August and as much as 65 points from September 2012. The decline reflects a favorable supply outlook, particularly for maize and rice. The Oils/Fats Price Index remained unchanged from August. The Dairy, Meat, and Sugar Indices all rose slightly in September.

The latest FAO Food Price Index, released last week, fell nearly four points from July and nearly 11 points from August 2012. This was the fourth consecutive month in which global food prices dropped.

The latest FAO Food Price Index was released yesterday, and is down four points from June and seven points from a year ago. This is the third consecutive monthly drop and is due in large part to lower grain, soy, and oil prices.

The FAO has released the latest version of its Food Price Index. The June Index was almost 2 points below May levels, but remained 11 points higher than in June 2012. The slight decline came mainly from sugar and dairy prices.

The Cereals Price Index also declined slightly by 2.5 points in June on expectations of bumper global crops. Tight coarse grain supplies are expected to continue until harvests in the fall, however, and the Index remains 14 points above its June 2012 level.

The FAO released today its latest Food Price Index, which has remained largely unchanged from last month at 215.2 points. While this is 10 points higher than in May 2012, it still remains nearly 10 percent lower than the peak seen in February 2011.

The Cereals Price Index rose four points from April, largely based on a strong rebound in maize prices as the US experienced planting delays and a tightening of exports. Wheat and rice prices, on the other hand, remained largely unchanged in May.

For the second month in a row, the FAO Food Price Index rose on sharp increases in dairy prices and marginal increases in meat. The Index averaged 215.5 points in April, up 2 points from March. At this level, the Index is only 9 points below its highest level, seen in February 2011.

The FAO Food Price Index rose slightly in March based on higher dairy prices. The Index rose by 1 percent from February, but is still 1.7 percent lower than March of 2012 and nearly 11 percent below its peak in February 2011.

In 2003, African leaders met in Maputo, Mozambique to try and stem the tide of Africa's long-standing hunger crisis. The need was critical - with Ethiopia experiencing widespread famine and drought threatening harvests throughout central and eastern Africa, the continent's food security challenges were becoming more daunting by the day.

The latest FAO Food Price Index, released last week, was unchanged from January levels, remaining steady at 210 points. This is five points lower than the levels seen in February 2012. The Cereals Price Index and Oils/Fats Price Index remained generally steady as well, experiencing a 1 percent drop and 0.4 percent rise, respectively. The slight decline seen for cereals is due mainly to improved wheat and maize prospects in the US.

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