With about one-third of all food produced around the world lost or wasted each year, reducing food loss and waste is a key component in ending hunger and malnutrition. A major hurdle, however, stems from the fact that food loss and waste are complex issues, and thus properly measuring them and identifying where in the food system they occur remain a challenge.

In recent years, many developing countries have seen significant reductions in chronic childhood malnutrition. Understanding what is driving these reductions is key in scaling up effective nutrition policies and strategies and reaching the nutrition goals set out in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

World Water Week 2017, from running from August 27- September 1 and organized by the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) explores the theme of water and waste (reduce and reuse). Water clearly plays a crucial role in global development, impacting agricultural production, economic growth, health and nutrition, and the environment.

Photo Credit: Imran Sohail

The latest Food Price Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA) Bulletin from FAO cites higher global wheat export prices in July, up 6 percent from June and 28 percent from July 2016. Continued hot, dry weather raised concerns about availability, particularly of high-quality wheat; the European Union and the Black Sea region also saw harvest delays, further pushing up prices.

Photo Credit: BBC World Service

The FAO’s monthly report on food price trends was released on July 10, 2017. The bulletin reports on recent food price developments over the past month at the global, regional, and country levels, with a focus on developing countries, and provides early warnings for high country-level food prices that may negatively affect food security.

Photo Credit: Mitchell Maher/IFPRI

The FAO’s monthly report on food price trends was released this week. The bulletin reports on recent food price developments over the past month at the global, regional, and country levels, with a focus on developing countries, and provides early warnings for high country-level food prices that may negatively affect food security.

Photo Credit: UN Photo/Kibae Park

This blog originally appeared on IFPRI.org

Photo Credit: < ahref="https://www.flickr.com/photos/iaea_imagebank/26623151151/">Dean Calma / IAEA

The World Bank recently released its 2017 Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals, which tracks progress on global and country-level progress toward the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) set forth by the UNDP in 2015. The atlas breaks down each of the 17 SDGs and uses maps and other data visualizations to illustrate trends, global-level and country-level analysis, and comparisons between countries.

The FAO’s monthly report on food price trends was released on April 10. The bulletin reports on recent food price developments over the past month at the global, regional, and country levels, with a focus on developing countries, and provides early warnings for high country-level food prices that may negatively affect food security.

In 2016, for the first time in modern history, the number of people living in extreme poverty fell below 10 percent and the global rate of undernutrition was expected to fall below 11 percent, according to IFPRI’s newly released 2017 Global Food Policy Report (GFPR).

Share