Photo Credit: UN Photo/Kibae Park

This blog originally appeared on IFPRI.org

Photo Credit: FAO

FAO recently released its latest Global Early Warning – Early Action (EWEA) report on food security and agriculture. The report is released quarterly, with this latest edition covering April-June 2017. The EWEA report provides an analytical summary of major disaster risks to food security and agriculture around the globe and aims to translate these forecasts and early warnings into action to mitigate or even prevent negative impacts on vulnerable populations.

Photo Credit: < ahref="https://www.flickr.com/photos/iaea_imagebank/26623151151/">Dean Calma / IAEA

The World Bank recently released its 2017 Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals, which tracks progress on global and country-level progress toward the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) set forth by the UNDP in 2015. The atlas breaks down each of the 17 SDGs and uses maps and other data visualizations to illustrate trends, global-level and country-level analysis, and comparisons between countries.

The FAO’s monthly report on food price trends was released on April 10. The bulletin reports on recent food price developments over the past month at the global, regional, and country levels, with a focus on developing countries, and provides early warnings for high country-level food prices that may negatively affect food security.

In 2016, for the first time in modern history, the number of people living in extreme poverty fell below 10 percent and the global rate of undernutrition was expected to fall below 11 percent, according to IFPRI’s newly released 2017 Global Food Policy Report (GFPR).

Since the 2007-2008 food price crisis, food price volatility has been front and center in the international development conversation. The period of the crisis saw a dramatic rise in the international price of grains and other important commodities, while the years immediately following the crisis saw increasing grain price fluctuations on the international market.

FAO estimates that around the world, about 795 million people still suffer from hunger and more than two billion people suffer from micronutrient deficiencies or forms of over-nourishment. Simultaneously, historical and future achievements in food security are under threat due to climate change and increasing pressures on natural resources.

Photo Credit: HarvestPlus

Micronutrient deficiencies afflict more than two billion individuals worldwide. These deficiencies occur when the intake and absorption of vitamins and minerals are too low to sustain good health and development.

Photo Credit: Flickr: USDA

The global population is expected to grow to more than 9 billion people by 2050. In such a scenario, ensuring the availability of and access to affordable and nutritious food will be a major challenge.

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