• Agricultural land is the percentage of total land that is arable, used for permanent crops, and used for permanent pastures. Arable land includes all land used for temporary crops, temporary meadows for mowing or for pasture, land used for market or kitchen gardens, and land that is temporarily fallow. Areas that are cropped multiple times are only counted once.

  • Agriculture value added is the net output of the agriculture sector, including forestry, hunting and fishing, and cultivation of crops and livestock production, after adding up all outputs and subtracting intermediate inputs. Deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets and depletion and degradation of natural resources are not included in the calculation.

  • Calorie supply per capita is amount of food available for consumption, measured in kilocalories per capita per day. This figure is reached by dividing the total available food supply for human consumption by the population. This dataset tracks the calorie supply per capita in each country for calories available from crop products. Although these figures can be taken as average supply available for consumption, actual consumption by individuals can vary greatly.

  • Calorie supply per capita is amount of food available for consumption, measured in kilocalories per capita per day. This figure is reached by dividing the total available food supply for human consumption by the population. This dataset tracks the calorie supply per capita in each country for calories available from livestock products. Although these figures can be taken as average supply available for consumption, actual consumption by individuals can vary greatly.

  • Children undernourished is the percent of children under 5 who are moderately or severely underweight. A moderately underweight child is defined as having a weight-for-age ratio that is minus 2 standard deviation from the median, while a severely underweight child is minus 3 standard deviations from the median. The median is derived from an international reference population defined by the World Health Organization.

    The source of the data comes from several household surveys developed and implemented by UNICEF as well as official national data reported to WHO.

  • This dataset contains futures closing prices from the past 60 days. For full futures data going back to 2001, see the Agricultural Prices and Returns tools.

  • This list of country names and spellings if drawn from the FAO. Geographic bounding boxes and centerpoint data is from the GeoNames database. Regional aggregation is from IFPRI.

  • CPI

    Consumer Price Index (CPI) is a measure of the change in the average price of consumer goods and services over time. It is taken by estimating the price of a standard group of goods over time. The CPI in a base year is set equal to 100, and all other years are related to that value. Below is the source, date acquired, and base year for each country. Note that some series have multiple base years for different time periods and all series are linked to former series.

    Bangladesh: Government officials; 2003: Series linked to former series.

  • Total external debt is the amount owed to nonresidents expressed in current U.S. dollars as a percentage of total GNI. Debt includes all public and private long- and short-term debt repayable in foreign currency, goods, or services.

  • Foreign direct investment is the net inflows of investment into a country from abroad.
    To qualify as investment the investing company must obtain a lasting management interest specifically a 10% or more of voting stock.

    The data is compiled from the International Monetary Fund, International Financial Statistics and Balance of Payments databases, and World Bank, Global Development Finance.

  • GDP is calculated at as the total value of all goods and services produced by residents of a country including any product taxes and minus subsidies that are not included in the value of output. Data is converted to current U.S. dollars using single year official exchange rates, though for a few countries where the official exchange rate is not reflective of the rate applied to actual foreign exchange transactions, an alternative conversion factor is used.

  • The Global Hunger Index (GHI) is calculated as the average of three indicators, the proportion of the population that is undernourished, the proportion of underweight children under five years old, and the proportion of children dying before age five. The index ranks countries on a 100 point scale, with 0 being the best and 100 the worst.

  • Inflation is the rate of change of prices in an economy. It is measured by calculating the annual growth rate of the GDP implicit deflator, which is the ratio of GDP in current local currency to GDP in constant local currency.

  • Gross national income (GNI) per capita is the total value produced by residents of a country including any product taxes and minus subsidies that are not included in the value of output plus net income from employee and property received from abroad.

    The GNI is converted to U.S. dollars using the World Bank Atlas method, which uses a three-year average of exchange rates, and divided by the midyear population

  • Maize exports is the amount of metric tons of maize leaving a country's borders in a given year. The data comes from governments most frequently through FAO questionnaires, though also through magnetic tapes and national publications. Import and export data is reported in terms of either general trade (recorded when entering or leaving the country's borders) or special trade (recorded when cleared through customs for home use or export).

  • Maize imports is the amount of metric tons of maize entering a country's borders in a given year. The data comes from governments most frequently through FAO questionnaires, though also through magnetic tapes and national publications. Import and export data is reported in terms of either general trade (recorded when entering or leaving the country's borders) or special trade (recorded when cleared through customs for home use or export).

  • This data represents the best available monthly price information for each country expressed in U.S. dollars per Kg. The price data comes from a combination of FAO Global Information and Early Warning System (GIEWS) and USAID Famine Early Warning System Network (FEWS) sources.

    The FAO data comes from GIEWS. Note that seasonal patterns such as harvest periods may account for some of the variations in prices. Notes about variations in each commodity and location are given below, with source information following each country:

    Brazil; National Average; Yellow Maize; wholesale.

  • Maize production is the amount of maize produced in a given country each calendar year, including both the quantities of the commodity sold in the market (marketed production) and the quantities consumed or used by the producers (auto-consumption). Harvesting losses, threshing losses, and unharvested portions of the crop are not included. Agricultural production data is obtained primarily from national governments through annually distributed FAO questionnaires.

  • National poverty rates is the percentage of a country's population living below the established poverty line in each country. Data is gathered from country surveys conducted between 1987 and 2006, and is from the most recent survey year available, as shown below for each country.

  • Population is total number of people residing within a country in a given year. The data is compiled by the Population Division of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the United Nations Secretariat using census and survey results from each countries. One should keep in mind that data reliability varies among countries, but the U.N. demographic models are widely accepted because they employ well-understood assumptions.

  • Population density is total number of people per square kilometer of land area residing within a country in a given year. The data is compiled by the United Nations Population Division (UNPD) using census and survey results from each countries. One should keep in mind that data reliability varies among countries, but the U.N. demographic models are widely accepted because they employ well-understood assumptions.

  • Population undernourished is the percentage of a country's population that consistently has a food intake that is less than a minimum dietary energy consumption required for maintaining health and performing light physical activity. This requirement varies by country, and is calculated by looking at the amount of food available in a country and a measure of inequality in distribution developed using household income and expenditure surveys. The minimum requirement for dietary energy is usually between 1750 and 2030 kilocalories per person per day.

  • Receipts of Food Aid is the amount of cereals designated as food aid and transferred to that country from all donors. Cereals include wheat, barley, maize, rye, oats, millet, sorghum, rice, buckwheat, alpiste/canary seed, fonio, quinoa, triticale, wheat flour, and the cereal component of blended foods. The figure represents cereal aid donated on a total-grant basis or on highly concessional terms. Data is compiled from information from donor countries and the World Food Programme (WFP).

  • This regional classification is by IFPRI.

  • Rice exports is the amount of metric tons of rice products leaving a country's borders in a given year. Rice products include rice paddy, milled rice, husked rice, and broken rice. The data comes from governments most frequently through FAO questionnaires, though also through magnetic tapes and national publications. Import and export data is reported in terms of either general trade (recorded when entering or leaving the country's borders) or special trade (recorded when cleared through customs for home use or export).

  • Rice imports is the amount of metric tons of rice products entering a country's borders in a given year. Rice products include rice paddy, milled rice, husked rice, and broken rice. The data comes from governments most frequently through FAO questionnaires, though also through magnetic tapes and national publications. Import and export data is reported in terms of either general trade (recorded when entering or leaving the country's borders) or special trade (recorded when cleared through customs for home use or export).

  • This data represents the best available monthly price information for each country expressed in U.S. dollars per Kg. The price data comes from a combination of FAO Global Information and Early Warning System (GIEWS) and USAID Famine Early Warning System Network (FEWS) sources.

    The FAO data comes from GIEWS. Note that seasonal patterns such as harvest periods may account for some of the variations in prices. Notes about variations in each commodity and location are given below, with source information following each country:

    Bangladesh; Wholesale; National Average.

  • Rice production is the amount of rice paddy produced in a given country each calendar year. Production includes the quantities of the commodity sold in the market (marketed production) and the quantities consumed or used by the producers (auto-consumption). Harvesting losses, threshing losses, and unharvested portions of the crop are not included. Agricultural production data is obtained primarily from national governments through annually distributed FAO questionnaires.

  • Soybean exports is the amount of metric tons of soybeans leaving a country's borders in a given year. The data comes from governments most frequently through FAO questionnaires, though also through magnetic tapes and national publications. Import and export data is reported in terms of either general trade (recorded when entering or leaving the country's borders) or special trade (recorded when cleared through customs for home use or export).

  • Soybean imports is the amount of metric tons of soybeans entering a country's borders in a given year. The data comes from governments most frequently through FAO questionnaires, though also through magnetic tapes and national publications. Import and export data is reported in terms of either general trade (recorded when entering or leaving the country's borders) or special trade (recorded when cleared through customs for home use or export).

  • Soybeans production is the amount of soybeans produced in a given country each calendar year, including both the quantities of the commodity sold in the market (marketed production) and the quantities consumed or used by the producers (auto-consumption). Harvesting losses, threshing losses, and unharvested portions of the crop are not included. Agricultural production data is obtained primarily from national governments through annually distributed FAO questionnaires.

  • Under-5 mortality rate is the number of children who die before the age of 5 per 1,000. The data on child mortality is provided by UNICEF and comes from civil registration records, and other surveys.

  • Unemployment is the percent of a population above a specified age who were without work, available for work and seeking work. The rate is determined as the unemployed proportion of the total labor force, those employed and unemployed. Users should exercise caution when comparing figures between countries, as the definition of unemployed, age specifications, collection methods, and regions covered varies across the data.

    Bangladesh: Persons aged 15 years and over. Year ending in June of the year indicated. 1996: Persons aged 10 years and over.

  • Weekly spot prices of major agricultural commodities for the current year. All agricultural data is in US dollars per ton; oil data is in US dollars per barrel. For full dataset of weekly spot prices dating back to 1998, view the Agricultural Commodity Prices and Returns tools.

  • Wheat exports is the amount of metric tons of wheat and wheat flour leaving a country's borders in a given year. The data comes from governments most frequently through FAO questionnaires, though also through magnetic tapes and national publications. Import and export data is reported in terms of either general trade (recorded when entering or leaving the country's borders) or special trade (recorded when cleared through customs for home use or export).

  • Wheat imports is the amount of metric tons of wheat and wheat flour entering a country's borders in a given year. The data comes from governments most frequently through FAO questionnaires, though also through magnetic tapes and national publications. Import and export data is reported in terms of either general trade (recorded when entering or leaving the country's borders) or special trade (recorded when cleared through customs for home use or export).

  • This data represents the best available monthly price information for each country expressed in U.S. dollars per Kg.

    The FAO data comes from GIEWS. Note that seasonal patterns such as harvest periods may account for some of the variations in prices. Notes about variations in each commodity and location are given below, with source information following each country:

    Bangladesh; Wholesale; National average.
    Brazil; Wholesale; National average.
    China; wheat (flour); Retail; Average of market prices in 50 large and medium cities.
    Colombia; Wholesale; Wheat flour; Bogota.

  • Wheat production is the amount of metric tons of wheat produced in a given country each year. The production figure includes the quantity of wheat sold in market and the quantity consumed or used by producers. Harvesting losses, threshing losses, and unharvested portions of the crop are excluded. The data comes from governments primarily through FAO questionnaires.

  • The world commodity prices are monthly averages of the prices taken on the day of the week indicated below. Prices are given in U.S. dollars/kg.

    The world wheat price is the monthly average of weekly prices for US No. 2, Hard Red Winter, US FOB U.S. Gulf as reported by the International Grain Council on Thursday of each week. Prices are given in U.S. dollars/kg.

    The world rice price is the monthly average of weekly prices for White Broken Rice, Thai A1 Super, FOB Bangkok as reported by Jackson Son & Co. (London) Ltd. on Wednesday of each week. Prices are given in U.S. dollars/kg.

  • The world maize price is the monthly average of weekly prices for US No. 2, Yellow, FOB U.S. Gulf as reported by the USDA on Friday of each week. Prices are given in U.S. dollars/kg.

  • Global oil price is the price in U.S. dollars per barrel of crude oil (petroleum). The official prices are calculated as a simple average of prices from Dated Brent, West Texas Intermediate, and the Dubai Fateh. Unofficial prices are calculated as a simple average of weekly prices from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  • The world rice price is the monthly average of weekly prices for White Broken Rice, Thai A1 Super, FOB Bangkok as reported by Jackson Son & Co. (London) Ltd. on Wednesday of each week. Prices are given in U.S. dollars/kg.

  • The world soybean price is the monthly average of weekly prices for US No. 1 Yellow soybeans, FOB U.S. Gulf as reported by the USDA on Friday of each week. Prices are given in U.S. dollars/kg.

  • The world wheat price is the monthly average of weekly prices for US No. 2, Hard Red Winter, US FOB U.S. Gulf as reported by the International Grain Council on Thursday of each week. Prices are given in U.S. dollars/kg.

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